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Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

3 edition of Feminizing venereal disease found in the catalog.

Feminizing venereal disease

Mary Spongberg

Feminizing venereal disease

the body of the prostitute of nineteenth-century medical discourse

by Mary Spongberg

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  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Macmillan in Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Prostitutes -- Health and hygiene.,
  • Prostitution -- History -- 19th century.,
  • Sexually transmitted diseases -- History -- 19th century.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementMary Spongberg.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC201.47 .S66 1996
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 231 p.
    Number of Pages231
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16513427M
    ISBN 100333639243


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Feminizing venereal disease by Mary Spongberg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse Paperback – November 1, by Mary Spongberg (Author)Cited by: In Feminizing Venereal Disease, Feminizing venereal disease book Spongberg provides a critical examination of this practice by examining the construction of venereal disease in 19th century Britain.

Spongberg argues that despite the efforts of doctors to treat medicine as a pure science, medical knowledge was greatly influenced by cultural assumptions and social and moral : $ Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse Mary Spongberg Published by New York Univ Pr ().

In Feminizing Venereal Disease, Mary Spongberg provides a critical examination of this practice by examining the construction of venereal disease in 19th century Britain. Spongberg argues that despite the efforts of doctors to treat medicine as a pure science, medical knowledge was greatly influenced by cultural assumptions and social and moral codes/5(8).

In Feminizing Venereal Disease, Mary Spongberg provides a critical examination of this practice by examining the construction of venereal disease in 19th century Britain. Spongberg argues that despite the efforts of doctors to treat medicine as a pure science, medical knowledge was greatly influenced by cultural assumptions and social and moral codes.

By focusing on representations of the prostitute in medical and Feminizing venereal disease book discourse, art, literature and religion this book Feminizing Venereal Disease - The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse | M.

Spongberg | Palgrave Macmillan. In the local council of a small town in Scotland issued an order that all light women--women suspected of prostitution-- be branded with a hot iron on their face. In late eighteenth- century England, the body of the prostitute became almost synonymous with venereal disease as doctors drew up detailed descriptions of the abnormal and degenerate traits of fallen women.

Feminizing Venereal Disease The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse. Authors; Mary Spongberg; Feminizing Syphilis. Front Matter. Pages PDF. The Sick Rose. Mary Spongberg. Pages The Source. literature and religion this book will chart these shifts, while at the same time exploring broader concerns.

Mary Spongberg is the author of Feminizing Venereal Disease ( avg rating, 8 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), Writing Women's History Since the Re /5.

Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse Paperback – 1 Nov by Mary Spongberg (Author)Author: Mary Spongberg.

Spongberg, M, Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-century Medical Discourse New York University Press, New York) Google Scholar | Crossref Stansfeld, J, Lord Kimberley's Defence of the Government Brothel System at Hong Kong, “Correspondence Relating to the Contagious Diseases Ordinances in Hong Cited by: Feminizing venereal disease: the body of the prostitute in nineteenth-century medical discourse.

Feminizing Venereal Disease traces the medicalization of the prostitute as a symbolic source of social disease - the ordinary sick body - of Victorian England. Book Publication details Spongberg, MFeminizing venereal disease: the body of the prostitute in nineteenth-century medical discourse, NYU Press, New by: My wife helps me through the Feminizer disease as I slowly become a full woman.

I have to learn a whole new life with her help. Feminizer Disease Takes My Body Over Chapter 1 By Terry Hansay I was getting very concerned as I noticed my body changing.

I have budding breasts and bigger hips. My wife said my breasts bounce and it looks bad. What is wrong. Feminizing venereal disease: the body of the prostitute in nineteenth-century medical discourse. [Mary Spongberg] -- In the late-eighteenth century all women were considered potentially infectious to men but by the early-twentieth century only certain women were considered vectors of.

Book Feminizing venereal disease: the body of the prostitute in nineteenth-century medical discourse. Mary Spongberg; Document Type. Book Publication Date. Citation Information. Spongberg, M Cited by: 5 The New Campaign Richard L.

Blanco, ‘The Attempted Control of Venereal Disease in the Army of Mid-Victorian England’, Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research, Cited by: 1. In addition to shouldering the blame for the increasing incidence of venereal disease among sailors and soldiers, prostitutes throughout the British Empire also bore the burden of the contagious diseases ordinances that the British government passed.

By studying how British authorities enforced these laws in four colonial sites between the s and the end of the. The doctor said I had the Feminizer disease and a strong case of it. I went numb and pale and they knew it.

I thought I was going to faint. Another nurse came in with water and helped me as I slowly fell off my chair in panic. "Please don't tell me that. How can I manage that. I'm a man!" Feminizer Disease Takes My Body Over Chapter 2 By Terry Hansay Sorry but I lost it again. The complaint of Catherine Morland in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, that history has 'hardly any women at all' is not an uncommon one.

Yet there is evidence to suggest that women have engaged in historical writing since ancient study traces the history of women's historical writing, reclaiming the lives of individual women historians, recovering women's historical 3/5(1). A lively interdisciplinary study of how venereal disease was represented in eighteenth-century British literature and art In eighteenth-century Britain, venereal disease was everywhere and nowhere: while physicians and commentators believed the condition to be widespread, it remained shrouded in secrecy, and was often represented using slang, symbolism, and.

Information on brothels and receiving houses comes from a number of sources: Proctorial syndicate records (U.A. Min VI.6, Spinning House commitals books (U.A.

1–3, the inmate books of the Cambridge Female Refuge (Cambridgeshire Record Office, hereafter –2], and the police court reports in, Cambridge Chronicle, Engel, op Cited by: Mary Spongberg, Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth- Century Medical Discourse (New York: New York University Press, ), pp.

1–6, quotation on : John Parascandola. UNICEF, Syphilis and the State: negotiating female citizenship in the post‐Second World War world. Women's History Review: Vol. 19, International Feminisms, pp.

Cited by: 2. She is author of Feminizing Venereal Disease (), which was shortlisted for the Premier’s History Prize inand Writing Women’s History Since the Renaissance (). With Barbara Caine and Ann Curthoys she edited the groundbreaking Companion to Women’s History () and she is on the Board of the New Historia at the New School.

Mary Spongberg, Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse (Basingstoke: Macmillan, ). Liz Stanley, Sex Surveyed, From Mass Observation’s Little Kinsey to the National Survey and the Hite Report (London: Taylor & Francis, ). Writing Women's History since the Renaissance also examines the relationship between women's history and the development of feminist consciousness, suggesting that the study of history has alerted women to their unequal status and enabled them to use history to achieve women's by: A sexually transmitted disease (STD), a.k.a.

Venereal disease (VD), is an illness that has a significant probability of transmission between humans or animals by means of sexual contact, including vaginal intercourse, oral sex, and anal singly, the term sexually transmitted infection (STI) is used, as it has a broader range of meaning; a person may be infected, and.

The association of prostitution with venereal disease encouraged medical intervention and began a movement away from the religious/moral model and toward the medical model (Bullough & Bullough, ). Syphilis was the venereal disease regarded as most serious, and a cure for it was the priority of medical by: 5.

Additionally, the transgender population has a higher prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, body image issues, osteoporosis, cancer, and heart disease caused by hormone treatments.

Many are also at increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse, which further changes nutrition needs (4). In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the unspoken fear of syphilis played a significant role in the development of beliefs about female sexuality. Many women were afraid of sexual relationships with men because they feared contracting syphilis, which was, at that time, by: 1.

course as a primary source. In Feminizing Venereal Disease, Spongberg identifies links between gender and disease by analyzing British medical literature on venereal disease and its political consequences.

In order to medicalize the prostitute body, physicians placed the blame for. Gonorrhoea is one of the most common sexually-transmitted bacterial infections, globally and in the United Kingdom. The levels of antibiotic resistance in gonorrhoea reported in recent years represent a critical public health issue.

From penicillins to cefixime, the gonococcus has become resistant to all antibiotics that have been previously used against it, in each case only a matter Cited by: 8.

* Books I’ve read. A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States (, rprt. ) *Mary Spongberg, Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in Nineteenth-Century Medical Discourse () *†Keith Wailoo, Dying in the City of Blues: Sickle Cell Anemia and the Politics of Race and Health ().

Author(s): Spongberg,Mary, Title(s): Feminizing venereal disease: the body of the prostitute in nineteenth-century medical discourse/ Mary Spongberg. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: Washington Square, N.Y. Venereal disease: A disease that is contracted and transmitted by sexual contact, caused by microorganisms that survive on the skin or mucus membranes, or that are transmitted via semen, vaginal secretions, or blood during intercourse.

The genital areas provide a moist, warm environment that is especially conducive to the proliferation of bacteria, viruses, and. No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States Since New York: Oxford University Press, Carmon, Irin.

Woman Has Affair, Sues Lover For Giving Her Herpes. Jezebel. J Chao, Loretta. Tracing Herpes Stigma Back to Its Origin. The Sex Reporter. Aug. 24, Clark-Flory, Tracy. Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum.

The signs and symptoms of syphilis vary depending in which of the four stages it presents (primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary). The primary stage classically presents with a single chancre (a firm, painless, non-itchy skin ulceration usually between 1 cm and 2 Diagnostic method: Blood tests, dark.

All the latest breaking news on sexually transmitted diseases. Browse The Independent’s complete collection of articles and commentary on sexually transmitted diseases. Henrik Johan Ibsen (/ ˈ ɪ b s ən /; Norwegian: [ˈhɛ̀nrɪk ˈɪ̀psn̩]; 20 March – 23 May ) was a Norwegian playwright and theatre one of the founders of modernism in theatre, Ibsen is often referred to as "the father of realism" and one of the most influential playwrights of his time.

His major works include Brand, Peer Gynt, An Enemy of the People, Emperor and Born: Henrik Johan Ibsen, 20 MarchSkien. Feminizing Venereal Disease: The Body of the Prostitute in by Mary Spongberg (5 copies) Hoeren en heren in de 19de-eeuwse literatuur by Jaap Harskamp (3 copies) Prostitution in the modern world;: A survey and a by Gladys Mary Hall (2 copies).We’re in the midst of a superheroine Golden Age.

When even Squirrel-Girl can score her own comic book, and it’s awesome, you know times are (relatively) good for .Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), also referred to as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), are infections that are commonly spread by sexual activity, especially vaginal intercourse, anal sex and oral sex.

Many times STIs initially do not cause symptoms. This results in a greater risk of passing the disease on to cations: Infertility.